‘Neutral Buoyancy’

Neutral Buoyancy

‘Neutral buoyancy’……weightlessness, feeling suspended, neither sinking nor floating.

A state of calm & balance, focusing on your own breathing and mortality, allowing you to fly slowly in a mainly silent, multidimensional, cushioned world. If sound comes, it comes from all sides, muffled and unsure of direction.

The light above is golden, the depths below are terror and intrigue. Slow steady breaths dispelling the anxiety of silently entering an uninvited other world….

 

I learnt to scuba dive in December and the feeling was so extraordinary I came home
and painted it. The words above describe how I felt and what I painted. I thought the painting needed some explanation as it is a little different from my normal style but I also thought that you don’t have to be a scuba diver to recognise some of these thoughts & feelings. I would be very interested in any feedback on this painting, I did give myself free rein & was a little surprised at how it turned out! Please feel free to comment.

5 thoughts on “‘Neutral Buoyancy’

  1. When you first posted a photo of this painting on facebook, I commented (with no explanation to inform me about your thoughts or the process) thus:

    “Multi-layered and deep with roses in perfect suspension…”

    To my mind, these three beautiful roses seem to be in the sky, amongst the clouds and the raindrops, but having read your explanation, they could also be underwater. However, I feel the roses themselves look too dry to be underwater; somehow, I feel that their being under water would change the quality of the light on the petals somehow… perhaps they’d be a little distorted… but apart from that, I can’t really put my finger on it…

    I like this painting very much and would certainly give it wall space 🙂

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    1. Hi Angie, thanks for your comments & I agree, there is a feeling of sky &’Ascension’ around the roses. I went to a convent for several years as a child and was surrounded by huge religious paintings. My favourites were always the ascension paintings as the light was so dramatic – I didn’t consciously try to recreate this, I’m not even religious, I just painted what felt right but ascending was obviously part of scuba diving & it’s interesting, for me, that you’ve pointed it out. Thank you 🙂

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  2. I find my best work happens almost by accident. When I decide to paint something specific and in a specific style it usually looks forced and I’m unhappy with it. Is this the same for you or am I just a terrible artist. Love what I’ve seen of your work, especially the tones of velvet series.

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    1. Thank you Steve! I think that is the very best & worst thing about being an artist! To keep doing your best work you have to give yourself time to keep exploring & most importantly making interesting mistakes! I describe it as the worst thing as it’s where the anxiety is too as when you work ‘off piste’ you can’t remember how you did it, scary when you look at your own work & think I don’t think I’ll ever be able to get back to that state of mind where everything just flows naturally.
      I have come from a design background so originally had to give myself a ‘brief’ to produce work but the times when I have just played in between ‘briefs’ are the times I have really evolved my work & been excited by the result. Thanks for your comment, it’s so right.

      Liked by 1 person

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